Destructive fit to expose dyskinesia at the gym

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In order to make full use of fitness programs, we all need encouragement. But sometimes it sounds like support (“move on! Harder!”) May help promote an unhealthy and addictive relationship with exercise. Researchers estimate that as much as 3% of fitness exercisers use fitness methods that can cause more harm than health. More importantly, many fitness professionals fail to notice that the daily activity of the bodybuilder has become out of control or shows signs of an existing illness.

An organization dedicated to teaching coaches and coaches warning signs or sports and eating disorders. Distructively Fit is an ACE and NASM certified 2012 three-hour training course designed by Jodi Rubin, an expert in eating disorders. Concerned that many gym employees lack awareness of this issue, Rubin is working hard to bridge the gap between fitness and mental health. Her organization is designed to help fitness professionals determine whether fitness practices for body-building athletes are approaching problems.

We sit down to talk with Rubin about the risks of continuing overdone – osteoporosis, kidney failure and cardiovascular damage, just to name a few – what we can do to combat the stigma of dyskinesia.
I’ve worked on behalf of my psychotherapy patient with trainers and fitness experts to advise on the unique needs and issues of working with clients who overcome their diet and dyskinesia. I am also interested in fitness, and like most people going to the gym, I noticed people were over-performing on the facilities I went to. I started wondering what the gym was doing on this obvious problem. I began to question the ethical and legal guidelines – only to find out that there is no diet-related illness in the fitness industry.

After talking to as many people in the fitness industry as possible, it is clear that the topic of eating disorders is a taboo topic – people think they should not come up with the topic because they have never been taught to solve the problem.

When you join a gym, you are asked about your health history – cardiovascular problems, past injuries, current medications, and more. However, few people have asked if you ever had food or exercise problems, even though we know that eating disorders have serious health consequences. So I designed a project to train fitness professionals to understand eating disorders, signs and symptoms and how to deal with these issues in practice.

In your course, you emphasize the importance of avoiding “exercise addiction.” why?

These are real diseases, not addicts. Excessive exercise is often a part of eating disorders – an imbalance, abuse, unhealthy relationship with the body and the need to do so. Modes of detoxification, such as drug or alcohol abuse, may not be suitable for treating eating disorders. In addition, there is no alcohol abstinence mode for dyskinesia. It is as unhealthy as exercising too much at all.

What are the signs (or symptoms) that clients or fitness users are using exercise in an unhealthy way?

Not all of this is obvious. Most people who exercise are not skinny and you can not just look at them. More obvious red flags include multiple sports a day, exhaustion to exercise, focus on exercise, or serious distress when unable to exercise. Another sign is that I’ve seen men and women running in the crew despite being sick or injured. And then the link between exercise and self-esteem is less obvious: it depends more and more on the miles you run or the amount of calories you burn, not on someone outside the gym.

What do you think led to people moving in unhealthy ways?

Attributed to the biological, psychological, family and social factors in the conflict. [These] combine to create a weakness to develop eating disorders and unhealthy behaviors, such as overuse of exercise, followed. A large proportion of them are low self-esteem and self-esteem exercises. We all walk in the same city and live in the same world, facing the same advertising and cultural pressures. But not everyone has developed eating disorders. There needs to be an emotional vulnerability to using exercise or food destructively for oneself.

Do you think the fitness industry encourages unhealthy body image, exercise and eating behaviors?

This is a tricky question because I do not think everyone in the fitness industry encourages unhealthy behavior. However, the emphasis on weight and body composition does not take into account the individual’s body – it seems to be a movement assumption that everyone goes out to work trying to lose weight and be torn apart. Marketing leads The use of gym and exercise can really inspire some but is very devastating to others. Fitspo is also very similar to thin-spo, and it supports the realization of an impractical and dangerous thin ideal idea.
What is the best way for a personal trainer or trainer to approach their suspect client?

Really nothing special, or the best way to treat someone. My class has three hours of reason! Everyone using exercise and confrontation is a very sensitive issue. In general, looking at someone from the perspective of honesty, openness, lack of judgment and support is a good start, but it does not stop there. Sometimes a person is not ready to approach yet. Each case has its own nuances. Therefore, a training program is needed to help professionals in the fitness industry keenly approach customers and pay attention to the nuances of customer issues.

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